The Successful Presenter

Communicate When It Counts

Slides don’t bore people. People using slides bores people.




There is one nightmare that nearly every presenter has both experienced and witnessed—one thing of which audience members are terrified when they walk into a presentation.

Boredom.

Not only do presenters often bore audiences, but in the worst circumstances, presenters bore themselves.

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An interesting article in the Harvard Business Review entitled “
The #1 Killer of Meetings (And What You Can Do About It),” Peter Bregman describes the journey he took to stop boredom and enhance engagement during his presentations. His conclusion is simple. If you don’t want anyone to be bored during your meetings or presentations, there is one simple thing you can do: turn off the projector.

Bregman’s transformation began after a two-day off-site meeting several years ago as he both watched and delivered slide-based presentations. In each presentation one of two things occurred: the audience tuned out or they poked holes in the presenter’s content.

“People tune out because nothing is required of them,” he explains in the article. “Or they poke holes because, if they don’t tune out, it’s the most interesting thing to do when someone is trying to prove there are no holes.”

After his experience, Bregman was determined to find a better way. “Over time,” he says, “I identified a single factor that makes the biggest difference between a great meeting and a poor one: PowerPoint. The best meetings don’t go near it.

“PowerPoint presentations inevitably end up as monologues,” he continues. “They focus on answers, and everyone faces the screen. But meetings should be conversations. They should focus on questions, not answers, and people should face each other. I know it sounds crazy, but I’ve found that even the hum of the projector discourages dialogue.”

Bregman’s findings directly support a recent experience I had with a group of emergency physicians from the Toronto area. Prior to this one-day workshop with a group of very experienced presenters, each participant was asked to bring a presentation with them to the training session. One by one, they stood up, loaded their slides, and began their presentation. After a few minutes, the projector was turned off and they were asked to and continue their presentation, using their slides as notes.

The results were amazing. As soon as the projector was turned off, everyone’s full and undivided attention shifted to the presenter. The audience immediately became engaged.

The tone of each presentation shifted from a monologue to a conversation and the audience started asking questions. The presenter became focused on answering questions and building understanding, rather than going through the pedantic exercise of marching through one slide after another.

Presenters began to think more before speaking, bringing more precision to what they said. They paused to allow the audience to think and absorb their information. They connected with the audience more effectively because they were looking at them, instead of at a screen.

All of which are aspects of a good conversation and, ultimately, an effective presentation.

Some people think that slides are not the problem. They believe presenters that don’t use slides properly is the reason we experience Death by PowerPoint. But, slides don’t bore people, people using slides bores people.

Throughout the last thirty years, I have watched the evolution of slides. I have never seen the use of slides improve the skills of any presenter, but I have frequently seen the use of slides make good presenters less effective.

If you wish to reduce boredom at your presentations, the answer is simple: Turn the projector off. Carry on a conversation with your audience.